West Ham

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The Ultimate West Ham United Experience

West Ham United, or commonly known as the Hammers, are based in Stratford, East London. They have spent most of their existence in the top flight and have always posed as a threat to the opposition. Since their formation in 1895, they have won three domestic cup competitions and are also known as the ‘Academy of Football’, due to their ability of producing young talent. Their fans are some of the most passionate going and they are very proud of their club. Their squad is full of international players and they have a vast amount of Premier League experience, as well as their manager David Moyes in their aim to return to the Europa League.



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We Bring You The Best West Ham United Experience

West Ham United, or commonly known as the Hammers, are based in Stratford, East London. They have spent most of their existence in the top flight and have always posed as a threat to the opposition. Since their formation in 1895, they have won three domestic cup competitions and are also known as the ‘Academy of Football’, due to their ability of producing young talent.

Their fans are some of the most passionate going and they are very proud of their club. Their squad is full of international players and they have a vast amount of Premier League experience, as well as their manager David Moyes in their aim to return to the Europa League.

The Hammers played most of their home matches at the famous Boleyn Ground/Upton Park since 1904, until they ‘upgraded’ to the former Olympic stadium, or the London Stadium, in 2016. West Hams original name was Thames Ironworks, and started out as an amateur team of employees working at Thames Ironworks and Shipbuilding Company, Limited.

They turned professional in 1898 after entering the Southern League Second Division and gained promotion to the First Division at the first attempt. After struggling in their first season in the First Division, they comfortably brushed aside Fulham in the relegation Play-Off in 1900, retaining their First Division status.

Originally, Thames Ironworks played in dark blue kits, before adopting the claret and blue style in 1899. After a dispute between the running and finances of the club, Thames Ironworks FC dissolved as a club, only to be immediately relaunched in 1900 as West Ham United FC and with Syd King at the helm. The club adopted their nicknames ‘the Hammers’ and ‘the Irons’ due to their roots and links of the club to Thames Ironworks.

West Ham played their matches up until 1904 at the Memorial Grounds in Plaistow, before moving to the Boleyn Ground. Their first match was against arch rivals, Millwall, a fixture that is still hotly contested to this day.

They joined the Western League in 1901, whilst still laying in the Southern Division one, before eventually becoming overall Champions of the Western League in 1907. They earned a place in the Football League Second Division in 1919, before reaching Division One in 1923.

Syd King left after a 32-year stay, and shortly after they were relegated to Division Two, and wouldn’t make it back to the top flight until 1958 under Ted Fenton. West Hams success went on to show in the 1966 World Cup, where the Hammers’ developed players Moor, Martin Peters, and Geoff Hurst all featured in the World Cup final which England went on to win.

Because of this, the statue opposite the Boleyn Ground commemorates the ‘three sons’ who helped win England their only World Cup. West Ham did not have success then until 1975, where they won the FA Cup again. After a change in managers, West Ham won both the 1976 FA Cup and European Cup Winners Cup.

During 1978 and 1992, West Ham switched a number of times between Division One and Two, but they were eventually back in the Premier League, and in the 1999-2000 season, guided them to winning the Intertoto Cup and UEFA Cup qualification.

However, he was sacked in 2001 after feeling he needed more funds when dealing with transfers.  By the end of the season, they were relegated to the Championship, and it took them until 2005 to return to the Premier League, with Alan Pardew in charge.

Five years later, they were back in the Championship after a dreadful season, and the Hammers turned to experience in the form of Sam Allardyce, bouncing straight back to the top flight. In 2014-15, the owners felt it was time for a change and appointed Slaven Bilic as manager, in the hope of bringing silverware to West Ham.

In his first season the qualified for the Europa League after a fantastic season, with the likes of Dimitri Payet and Michael Antonio flourishing under his leadership. Despite the sale of Payet, West Ham reinvested well and game by game, adapting more and more to their new surroundings.

The London stadium is a great attraction for fans, alongside the passion and atmosphere carried from the Boleyn ground, is a certain to visit if the opportunity comes.

The 2017-18 season was the second West Ham spent in the London Stadium, a great attraction for fans and players after the passion and atmosphere that was carried in the Boleyn Ground, but it was another frustrating one as far as results are concerned.

A number of great signings were made by Slaven Bilić in the summer of 2017 before the campaign kicked off. Marko Arnautović joined from Stoke City, along with ex-Manchester United striker Javier Hernández and free agent Pablo Zabaleta.

The transfer window also saw a bit of an exodus, with first-team departures including Enner Valencia, Darren Randolph, Ashley Fletcher, Sofiane Feghouli, Diafra Sakho, Andre Ayew and José Fonte. Manchester City goalkeeper Joe Hart also joined on loan.

However, he was one of many downsides as West Ham were quickly wrapped into the relegation scrap and protests got as bad as angry fans invading the pitch and throwing missiles at the owners sat in the stands. Bilić was dismissed of his duties in November 2017 which saw David Moyes join.

Moyes turned the season around and helped West Ham to a respectable 13th-place finish, far away from relegation. The Hammers also reached the quarter-finals of the EFL Cup before being eliminated by finalists Arsenal.

After one season, Moyes left his post as boss in May and was replaced by Premier League title-winning manager Manuel Pellegrini, who enjoyed great success with Manchester City. Promising centre-back Issa Diop, rated goalkeeper Lukasz Fabiański and Fulham right-back Ryan Fredericks all signed deals for the 2018-19 campaign in June as Pellegrini looks to get West Ham where they should be.

West Ham United football tickets

What better way of visiting the impressive London Stadium than to get cheap football tickets to watch West Ham United play in the Premier League. We make sure that, unlike the bubbles in the air, your money doesn’t just float away and dissolve as we provide you with 100% official West Ham United football tickets for all matches. West Ham United Tickets can be purchased safely and easily using Visa, Mastercard or Maestro with our secured payment system.

 

Box Office Events’ guide to buying West Ham United tickets

West Ham United Football Club are currently preparing for their seventh consecutive season in the Premier League for the first time in 16 years.

Back in 2016, the Hammers relocated to the London Stadium which has significantly increased the club’s attendance and ticket costs.

However, here at Box Office Events, we aim to help you to be able to find the best possible ways of purchasing West Ham United football tickets.

Season Tickets
Purchasing a season ticket with the club is the best of way of securing a seat for all of West Ham’s league matches for the 2018/19 season.

The club currently allow up to 52,000 season ticket holders to have seasonal passes per campaign.

Season tickets are sold at six different rates, dependant on the supporter in question, which are: adults aged between 21 and 64, senior citizens and fans aged between 16 and 20, fans under 16 years of age, adults requiring disability access, senior citizens and young adults requiring disability access and junior fans requiring accessibility.

Prices for standard seating season tickets for adults cost between £320 and £945 (£16.84-£49.74 per match), whilst prices for fans aged 65 and over and between 16 and 20 cost between £160 and £475 (£8.42-£25 per match) and season cards for fans aged 15 and under is priced between £99 and £300 (£5.21-£15.79 per match).

Accessibility season tickets are significantly reduced for fans of all ages. For adult supporters, this costs between £160 and £475 (£8.42-£25 per match), between £160 and £300 (£8.42-£15.79 per match) for young adults and senior citizens, and between £99 and £300 (£5.21-£15.79 per match) for junior members.

There is a two-year season ticket option available for fans of all ages in both regular and accessibility areas, which works out as being considerably cheaper than the one-year season card. This costs £289 (£15.21 per match) for adults for each year, £145 (£7.63 per match) each year for adults in accessibility areas and for senior citizens and young adults in both standard and accessibility areas, and at £99 (£5.21 each match) each year for juniors in all areas of the London Stadium. Any fans opting for this option must purchase membership for both years at the same time, whether this is up front or by using the available four or 10-month payment plans.

Season tickets are also available in the 1966 premium seating areas, which costs £1,155 (£60.79 per match) for members of all ages.

Benefits that all season ticket holders will receive include: your guaranteed seat at all 19 home league matches, a price saving compared to purchasing match tickets for every game by over £400 for adults and by over £600 for fans under 16-years-old, use of the club’s Ticket Exchange service, priority access to purchase tickets for away matches and cup games and several offers such as discounts on merchandise, travel and more.

Payment for season tickets can be made either outright or via the clubs’ optional four or 10-month payment plans.

Currently, there is a waiting list for season tickets and a place on the waiting list costs £12 to join, but this fee is significantly reduced for members.

Memberships
If you are unable to either attend all of West Ham’s home league games or cannot afford to, then purchasing a membership with the club is the next best way of gaining access to tickets.

Claret membership currently ranges in price from £27 to £48, depending on the member’s age and location of residency.

Standard Claret membership is for fans aged 16 and over and costs £42 for the year. This membership includes: priority ticket access to tickets on all fixtures in the Premier League and in domestic cup competitions, a £5 discount from general sale ticket prices, additional merchandise offers and discounts, free entry to prize draws within the club’s exclusive monthly competitions, free admittance to all Premier League 2 matches to watch all of the club’s under-23 matches at the London Stadium, discounted rates for season tickets and match tickets to watch the club’s ladies side, an exclusive Claret Member access card and a discount on official coach travel to away games.

For fans aged between five and 15, Claret Kids membership is purchasable for £27 and includes: priority access to tickets, a £5 saving on all ticket prices, the opportunity to attend two ‘Kids for a Quid’ fixtures in the league during the season, discounted ticket prices for Category A fixtures when sat in seat bands four and five, an invite to the Junior Hammers Party, additional discounts and offers on merchandise, entry to exclusive monthly competitions, free entry to any league matches for the club’s under-23s when they play at the London Stadium, discounts on official away coach travel, savings when purchasing match and/or season tickets to watch West Ham United Ladies and an exclusive Claret Member access card.

Young supporters under of the five are eligible for Iron Born membership, which costs the same as Claret Kids membership and reaps all of the same benefits. The only difference is that members will receive an Iron Kids member access card instead of a Claret member one.

All memberships are available to supporters living outside of the United Kingdom, with prices costing an additional £5 to each membership price to turn them into the International membership equivalents.

For an additional £1 to the total fee of Claret, Claret Kids, Claret International, Claret Kids International, Iron Born and Iron Born International memberships, you can be added to the waiting list for season tickets, which works out as being 91.7% cheaper than paying the outright fee of £12 to join the waiting list.

Buying Tickets
The club offers three direct ways of purchasing tickets; via their over the phone box office, at the ticket office at the London Stadium or West Ham’s official website.

Tickets for members in standard seating are priced between £20 and £65 for adults and between £7.50 and £45 for fans of all other ages inside standard and accessibility seating.

Individual match ticket prices inside 1966 seating costs between £35 and £75 for fans off all ages and for accessibility-based spectators.

When a match is sold out, season ticket holders can list their tickets at face value if they are unable to attend, with the money earned from sales useable in either the club shop or on season ticket renewals.

The ticket exchange service also allows fans to donate their season ticket to the West Ham Foundation so that deprived supporters in the local area can attend when the season ticket holder is unable to.

Official West Ham United football tickets can also be purchase via Box Office Events.

General Sale
Because of the club’s incredibly high percentage of capacity filled by season ticket holders, it is rare that tickets ever reach general sale.

When tickets do reach general sale, their price is £5 more expensive than it is for members and season ticket holders.

Hospitality Packages
West Ham offer numerous hospitality packages to allow fans looking to add sophistication and fine dining to their matchday experience. These include, a range of premium dining, exclusive bars and platinum experience lounges.

Platinum experiences that the club offer are inside both The Arnold Hills and The Royal East lounges.

Hospitality inside The Arnold Hills lounge comes with: a superb view of the pitch from inside the lounge, VIP match seating in the mid-tier of the West Stand, access to the lounge pre-match, at half-time and post-match, a private table for you and your guests, a 3 course a la carte menu, a complimentary beer, wine or soft drink at half time, the facility of using a cash bar, a complimentary matchday programme for every guest and a visit from a former West Ham United player.

Meanwhile, fans using The Royal East lounge will receive all the same benefits but will be served a luxury three-course buffet meal instead of an a la carte menu.

Premium Dining experiences can be enjoyed from either The Great Briton or The Forge.

Seating in The Great Briton is located in the upper tier of the West Stand and comes with the exact same benefits that The Royal East Lounge includes.

The Forge’s seating can be accessed via either the upper or lower tiers of the West Stand and comes with the same benefits as the other hospitality packages but with a two course a la carte menu as their main meal.

There are three Platinum Experience bars, which are at The Academy, The Boleyn Bar and The Londoner.

Both The Academy and The Boleyn Bar come with: VIP match seating in the West Stand, access to the lounge before and after the match, as well as at half time, a complimentary drink at half-time (beer, wine or soft drink), a guest appearance from a West Ham legend, purchasable snacks and a complimentary matchday programme.

Whilst The Londoner comes with all of those benefits, fans sat here will also receive the option to purchase a range of traditional food.

All hospitality lounges are accessible up to two-and-a-half hours before kick-off.

There is currently a waiting list to get access to hospitality packages, which costs £12 to join.

Best places to sit at the London Stadium
Some Hammers supporters believe that the best views of the pitch can be seen from the upper tiers of the stadium, particularly inside the Sir Trevor Brooking Stand.

However, for fans looking to be part of an atmospheric crowd, then head to the corner of the East Stand, one of the better-known areas of the stadium for its noise and support.

London Stadium information and facts
The London Stadium is located on Marshgate Lane, Stratford, East London. Postcode: E20 2ST.

It opened in May 2012 and under its original name, the Olympic Stadium, as it was initially built to help host much of 2012 Olympic Games in London.

Since 2015, British Athletics have made it their permanent home, but a year later, West Ham United also became joint tenants on the stadium.

There is a regulated capacity of 57,000, making it the fourth largest football stadium in England and the third largest in London. It has a total sports capacity of 66,000 and can hold up to 79,990 people for music concerts.

Besides Olympic events and football, several other sports have also been played at the London Stadium.

The 2015 Race of Champions motorsport event was held at the arena, the first time that it was held for seven years. Also, that year, six matches of the 2015 Rugby Union World Cup were held at the London Stadium, which included the Bronze final, between South Africa and Argentina, with the former winning 24-13.

Earlier this year, Saracens’ rugby union team beat local rivals Harlequins 24-11 in their annual ‘Derby Day’ match.

England have held two rugby league internationals at the stadium which ended in defeats against New Zealand in November 2015 and Australia in November 2016.

Many musicians have performed inside of the current home of the Hammers, including Robbie Williams, Beyonce, Jay-Z and Guns ‘N Roses.

Stratford International and Stratford Westfield are the nearest car parks to the ground, although the club recommend completing your journey to the stadium via public transport or on foot.

The nearest station to the ground is at Pudding Mill Lane and serves the District Light Railway line on the London Underground, which is only a 10-minute walk away from the stadium. Stratford International station, Hackney Wick and Stratford station are all also situated within a 20-minute walk away from the London Stadium.

Stratford and Stratford City are nearest bus stops to the stadium, which run numerous services on matchdays that come to and from many areas of London.